Past, Present and Future Borders of the World

NARP Energy Portfolio Director Rick Van Schoik travelled to University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) and Matamoros, Tamaulipas last week to talk about the “U.S.- Mexico Border Economy in Transition” report, to develop an understanding of binational innovation clusters there with United Brownsville, and also to discuss borders of the world yesterday, today, and tomorrow at the UTB Comparative Borders Conference. He spoke about failed states and their borders, those borders fractured by military aggression, those becoming more fixed, those still fuzzy, those, due to pressures, that are becoming more fluid and flexible, and finally those that are as open, or to continue the alliteration, freer.  He then commented on what all this implied for North American sovereignty and borders.  For example Mexico’s recent change to their constitution means law enforcement officers from the U.S can apply to carry weapons in the course of their duty, another way that the two nations have moved the border away from the border.